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Search Results 0 to 29 of about 30 (some duplicates have been removed)
christy is wrong, i do not have to tell him that, because the science tells him that. >> there was a poll, saying that parents think in video games contributes to a culture of violence. 89% of parents polled, point the finger of violence to tv and movies. what do you say to the parents every day, everything americans that are saying that as a parent, they look at it and feel that way that these violent video games add something to the culture of youth they are raising? >> well, first of all, i support the rights of any parent to not buy any product that they do not want to buy for their children. and that is why the video game industry has spent a long time cataloging and creating ratings systems and labeling descriptions on every game that is sold in the stores so they know what is it in so they do not have to buy it for their children. the science points to something different that the science shows that and this is confirmed by the surgeon general and by the supreme court that video games are not posing danger for adults or children. >> when we look at 2008, the stats, game makers have
first day of work to his last, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. the battle of bataan, 1942. [ all ] fort benning, georgia, in 1999. [ male announcer ] usaa auto insurance is often handed down from generation to generation because it offers a superior level of protection and because usaa's commitment to serve the military, veterans, and their families is without equal. begin your legacy. get an auto-insurance quote. usaa. we know what it means to serve. >>> since republicans flopped in the election, they've been getting all kinds of advice about how to fix the party. today, peggy noonan wrote an article called it's pirate time for the gop. pirate time. she says now the time to put a dagger between their teeth, wave a sword, grab a rope and swing to the enemy's gallliean. the they never belonged to him. they're yours. well, shiver me timbers. peggy noonan has gone pirate. she's looking to taxes, immigration, guns. in other words, become more like president obama. ahoi, there, maties. that's a swash buckling idea. but, unfortunately, the gop is goin
straightforward guidance and be able to focus on other things, like each other, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. >>> since republicans flopped in the election, they have been given all manner of advice about how to fix the party. and today, peggy noonan, the conservative columnist for "the wall street journal" wrote it is pirate time for the gop. pirate time. she says now is the time to put a dagger between their teeth, wave a sword, and swing to the enemy. the president's issue, take them, steal them, they're never wrong, they're never yours. well, peggy noonan has gone pirate and wants the gop to go pirate, on issues like taxes, immigration, guns. in other words, become more like president obama. ahoy there, maties, that is a swash buckling idea. but unfortunately, the gop is going the other way. they are likely to cut funds, demand offsets. these black-hearted rogues include congressman rogers, tom mcclintock. give them all an eye patch. that is just awful. and the party is not getting better on women's issues either. today, a republican lawmaker had t
professor. that is just to say -- i taught that and political science classes. is this an ecological fallacy? we look at the collective data and things going on. the neighborhoods where kids are growing up also have a ton of other sociological indicators with poor performing schools and more likely to be arrested because of police. how solid is this as a scientific and statistical matter, how much should i be convinced by these data? >> i think the main convincing data is the mri data for the brain damage that is being seen for individuals with children where lead poison compared to individuals who are not poisoned as children. it's a very clear difference between the two. i think it's the main medical -- >> how much lead does it take to be lead poisoned? >> very small amounts. >> i happen to have a demonstration with me. these are one gram packets. within each of the packets, there's 1 million micrograms. we are worried about children who get exposed to six milli millionths of what is in this package. that's 1 million of micrograms. totally invisible. in every gallon of gasoline, there were
cooperation. why is that? i know evolutionary science dictates our behavior ensures survival. that is why men fight wars. in china or india it's reversed, their women are disposable. they reported india china possesses as many unmarried young many as the whole population of american men. these unbalanced rates are linked to female abduction and ra rape. i'm no fan of search research, but if you look at the stats, crimes against women increase. you don't hear much from feminists on that stuff. is it because being pro-choice isn't always being pro women. time is only on mick jagger's side because he has the wanted to pay for it. his play things weren't as lucky. >> can we do that again? >> both ideas, consequences of feminism and free love, both offer illusions of power that are only temporary. >> only women entranced by the delusion. >> greg: lifestyles that entail risk are beneficial to men but risk attract women into the fold and they can't sustain the same lifestyle. perfect example. whatever happens to the groupies where did they go. >> kimberly: how did you develop this soft spot for grou
to go to that is on the far side of the moon that can be the robotic science can do the mining for the ice crystals and convert that into hydrogen and oxygen which is fuel the conference recently as following a workshop that has been sent out in the international learning basis by practicing on the island of hawaii to assemble a large number of large objects. you put the first one down and where are they expected? another one down at some distance away how do you put them together? if it's on hawaii, you do that through a satellite back to the mission control. so you prove that you can do something like that here in the united states. then we do it at the moon. why am i so enthusiastic about that? because that's exactly what we want to do at mars. we want to put people on the moon of mars who can then assemble the base we will then send people and we should assure ourselves we should protect crew members from radiation as much as possible before they ever go somewhere and that's the moon, too. >> kevin has a two-part question and i should ask the second part first. do you belie
for information and open science good, i don't see how this can be harmful. when we tell north koreans -- i've been dealing with them for years, what they are doing is heading toward a path toward confrontation against their own interests. against their own economic growth by spending so much on nuclear weapons, on missile tests, that's the message that they receive, and maybe we'll do some good, maybe not. and then there is the american there. >> you didn't get a chance to meet with kenneth bay. his son had written a letter, that he was hopeful you would deliver to his father. what happened on that front? >> the letter will be delivered. kenneth bay is way up in the northern part of the country. not accessible to us. but we made the point very strongly that he should be treated properly. we were assured that the judicial proceedings on his case would happen soon. that's sometimes a good sign, because it means it may be wrapping up and hopefully he'll be released. nobody had been -- we have a swedish representative there. we don't have representatives in north korea, advocating for him. thi
the fires of held. >> he was on the science committee,by the way. >> exactly. >> now, when you look at the fact that they're at a historic level of unpopularity, the 2012 average approval rating was 125% for them. the lowest in the 38-year history of gallop, they had the lowest. and you wrote, bob, that the gop is the party that won't compromise. the party that threatens economic chaos. the antimedicare, antisocial security, anti-hispanic, anti-gay, there is no future in that? >>. >> there is no future in that for them, politically. uch a bunch of people who come, and i think cynthia is absolutely right about that. they come from districts where they only worry about a challenge from the far right. so they keep moving far to the right. but what this does is make the republican party the face of an increasingly small, increasingly isolated, demographically limited group of people in america. and, you know, maybe they can keep their house seats. but they're never going to win the presidency if they go down this road. you may notice e notice what they're doing right now is beginning to
, but twice in the science classroom. two other students and a teacher also suffered minor injuries. the teacher, ryan heber, is now credited with coaxing the young gunman into putting the shotgun down. his co-worker kim fields helped distract the shooter so students could then get out. >> this teacher and this counselor stood there face to face, not knowing whether he was going to turn the shotgun on them, and -- because they have seen the news media throughout our country in the last several months, and they probably expected the worst and hoped for the best, but they gave their students a chance to escape and conversed and it worked. >> the sheriff says the student used a shotgun, he took from a sibling. taft union high school does use an armed guard, but he was snowed in yesterday and was not able to get to school. >>> the number of children dead from the flu is up nationwide. the cases of the illness are down in some parts of the country. at least that's the word we have gotten today from the cdc on what is turning out to be one of the worst flu seasons in years. dr. sanjay gup
was an editor, what they call an acquiring nature. worked in social science and history for a number of years and became executive editor and editor-in-chief of perhaps two different directors. c-span: what did you learn in that job that you applied to your book on teddy roosevelt or harry truman? >> guest: well first of all you learned something about writing. i read hundreds of manuscripts over the years. you learned what is good writing and what is not good writing. i was very particular. if even plus a famous author submitted i would turn it down or i would say get yourself an editor and rewrite this. it's an interesting story whatever it was and of course i made a few enemies by doing that. and then there were the authors who wrote like a dream, and i loved publishing them. i have also instituted a very large translation program at harvard when i had the power to do this. we probably published the most important history books coming out of france over a 10 or 12 years period. with the french were writing about was what they called the history over four or 500 years, not the history of 10
. but rocket science, no gimme. 8 miles high in august failed. only new aircraft that can glide back to earth shuttle style did this kerry test in colorado last year safe landing it hopes to test with humans by 2016. and the fourth company commercial company boeing dropped its space capsule with three parachutes last year to a safe landing all on target for full test flights in 2016. >> what that says is how important this program is to our country and to our industry. people want to believe think want to feel that exploration means something. no surprise space x will be the first of these commercial companies to test fly with humans to low earth orbit. they plan to do that within three years. shep? >> shepard: phil keating live in south florida. the syrian government continues to murder its own people. today it freed more than 2,000 detainees in exchange for nearly 50 iranians. that's according to officials in turkey who helped to broke they're exchange. rebel fighters capture ited the iranians last auger in the syrian capital of damascus. they claim they were members of iran's revolutionary
to his last, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. my ex-girlfriend... 7th grade math teacher. who is this? that's pete. my... [ dennis' voice ] allstate agent. a "starving artist" has an allstate agent? he got me... [ dennis' voice ] the allstate value plan. it's their most affordable car insurance and you still get an agent. [ normal voice ] i call it... [ dennis' voice ] the protector. is that what you call it? the protector! okay. ♪ the allstate value plan. are you in good hands? >>> a long-time senator jay rockefeller of west virginia says he's going to retire when his term ends next year. that and that gives republicans a good chance, a great chance, to pick up a senate seat. rockefeller is one of the most senior senate democrats serving since 1984. in that time his state has shifted from deep blue to deep red. consider this, west virginia was reliably democratic in presidential elections voting for carter over reagan in 1980 and mike dukakis in '88. but since 2000 it's been solidly republican and president obama lost the state by 2
of work to his last, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. it's just common sense. we asked total strangers to watch it for us. thank you so much. i appreciate it. i'll be right back. they didn't take a dime. how much in fees does your bank take to watch your money? if your bank takes more money than a stranger, you need an ally. ally bank. your money needs an ally. ♪ [ male announcer ] don't just reject convention. drown it out. introducing the all-new 2013 lexus ls f sport. an entirely new pursuit. office superstore ink retailer in america. now get $6 back in staples rewards for every ink cartridge you recycle when you spend $50 on hp ink. staples. that was easy. >>> what happens when you combine two game-changing ideas to one company. you have a stock like athena health, one that's run up 57% in the last 12 months. athena provides software platforms for electronic medical records and for helping doctors collect their bills from patients and insurance companies. they're trying to modernize the doctors office along the lines of a company like cerna,
including it was an award from the american science association for the best book of political science. also a key facilitator of a summer security studies workshop that probably somewhere around 75 percent of all the security studies professors in the nation have attended. also a great deal of experience in the policy field, a senior fellow at the council on foreign relations where he served as director of national security studies, former staff member of the church committee and worked in the national security council and serve six years and a national security advisory panel for the cia director. most recently he was part of a task force of experts behind report entitled a new u.s. defense strategy for a new era. finally, and joined by paul wolfowitz, a scholar at the american enterprise institute with more than three decades of experience in public service and higher education and an incredibly wide variety of roles as president of the world bank, dean of the johns hopkins school of international studies, the state department director of policy planning in this is the secretary of state
judges, i think you have to ask those questions. those are simple questions. it is not rocket science. i used to teach in american university. used to teach courses to cops and prosecutors. this is not rocket science. i don't know if aid should be rocket science. i have been impressed that some people have said we really need a designed program knowing where we are working. if we know we're working in the most corrupt country and the world, we design a program that protects the funding. i was very impressed with that. [laughter] i have not seen a program with that bill 10. t in.ild people tell me they are thinking about it. some the -- someone told me the norwegians do that but i have not run into many norwegians. yes, sir? you are norwegian? >> no. one thing i came away with is that the afghans are very good at running their own businesses but what we do as we create an incentive or by running a business is about profits. i have partnered with an afghan and several afghans' over there and we are trying to build infrastructure where afghans have a stake in the infrastructure itself rathe
on the subject because there's no evidence, never been any evidence, i mean data evidence, social science that shows at that guns control reduces crime. if you would get it through congress you would have adults talking about it in public and that's messy and unfortunate and difficult. >> what we want. >> tucker: it's easier to force through on executive order. >> alisyn: we shall see if that's what their plan is and we'll talk more about what the center for american progress proposed. you know the story of the journal news, at that published the names and addresses legal gun owners our own judge jeanine pirro was on that list, last night on her show, she just-- well, first what she did was send one of other producers to the journal news to try to get answers for why they did this. let's see what happened when the producer showed up. >> why won't you talk to us? can you tell me why you guys released the names of the gun owners? >> i'm sorry i'm on the phone. >> janet-- as you can see, we have door slammed right in our face. >> so not terribly receptive to having a conversation and to expl
remain first in science, technology, and energy. that the educate and prepare our young people for the jobs of tomorrow and that when we make it in america, all the people can make it in america. the strength of our democracy also demands that we restore the confidence of the american people in our political process. we must empower the voters and remove obstacles of participation in democracy. [applause] we must increase the level of civility and reduce the role of money in our elections. in [applause] when we do, we will elect more women, more minorities, more young people to public office. [applause] the american people are what make our country great. by and large [applause] -- by and large the united states is a nation of immigrants who share our patriotism and seek the american dream. the strength of our democracy will be advanced by our bold actions on comprehensive immigration reform. [applause] [applause] today we take an oath to protect and defend the constitution, our people, and our freedom. to protect and defend. that is our first responsibility and our democracy r
at harvard wrote a piece, an op-ed in "christian science monitor" in december of 2008 or so. ncrc proposed doing this with federal fund through a federal agency. and i wrote an article in "the new republic" in lar of 2010 suggesting treasury could use tarp fund and act exactly as the homeowners loan corporation had done, do this not for a profit but specifically to help homeowners. american securitization forum wasn't for that either. >> i just, real quick point on just clarify my position. i'm not opposed to the in concept the use of eminent domain for borrowers who are upside-down, who are current. i'm simply saying that the priority would be in my view for those who are already experiencing financial distress. when you get to the point of they're current, i think other tests could be put in place. that's why i think there needs to be a lot more detail on the table before there's a vote of yes or no. for example, if you're paying 70% of the your income to keep that mortgage current, do you want to force that homeowner to actually go into default before they actually get help and wreck th
association of colleges. brand new numbers on the range of salaries, for humanities and social sciences jobs, starting stallry, $37,000. john is laughing and giggling. $62,000 for engineers. choose your major wisely. but the good news here is that graduate salaries are rising and a little easier to get a job this year than last year. >> you need to do a story on that choose your major wisely. >> so hard when are you 18 to choose your major wisely. you're 18. >> you can give parameters and good advice, christine. i'll hold you to that. >>> coming up, look at this. the gun stunt that caused a police lockdown in the northwest. >>> nine years old and an oscar nominee. you will hear from her on what that's like. coming up. ♪ why not make lunch more than just lunch? with two times the points on dining in restaurants, you may find yourself asking why not, a lot. chase sapphire preferred. there's more to enjoy. spending the day with my niece. i don't use super poligrip for hold because my dentures fit well. before those little pieces would get in between my dentures and my gum and it was uncomfort
, the bringing of science and technology. you're a world bank guy. you went to harvard and did a special the insight technology. so here we are, this tremendous knowledge in these fields. well, we talk about how they democracies, how do you see that from not only education, at full ride scholarships? that's ours but there are others whether it's french, canadians, the brits. so there are other ways for education, the empowerment of women and racial status inclusion, the international or american bar society helping with institutions. what do you think about that? or is it such that unless you're big much to that unless you big muscular defense, big muscular foreign aid, og, america is trying to toy with income and so is the west. i don't think america will ever be when be in anything, but i'm more of an additional school of thought. what do you think? >> thank you spent what would help colombia and help colombia in what would have latin america? >> thank you. certainly i can tell that the u.s. support and to speak very frankly on what you have request, the u.s. support on law enforcement
. if you can go into where there's a political science program or computer science program that you could get some sort of credit, school credit, college credit, high school credit for working as a poll worker, that may help with the process of identifying those folks who have the time to spend 12 to 14 to $16 a polling place. last but not least, you know, we talked about on more than one occasion how they are voting. if the election day was on holiday, or if it was -- if workers were given the ability to take today off without penalty, without losing pay, would they participate as a co-worker -- paul worker. there and be paid $180 for 12 or 16 hours they are not interested and a turnaround and lockout so there has to be a way to identify resources to work as poll workers and if we are in a more able, then some of the efficiencies of the polling places will increase i believe. >> thank you. cliff. >> obviously from a new jersey, new york standpoint, contingency planning -- because i don't think we have ever faced anything like this before, and would be a missed opportunity if we don't rea
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including the wilson award for the best book of political science and a key facilitator of a workshop that some effect percent of all professors in the nation have attended. also with a great deal of experience in the policy field and a former staff member working on the national security council and advisory panel for the cia director and part of a task force from a report entitled the new u.s. defense strategies for a new era. as a scholar at the american enterprise institute has three decades of public service to higher education as dean of johns hopkins in the state department of planning and the secretary of state just up to the secretary of defense. i will pose a question to kickoff the conversation. the first question is what have been done in new york -- new year's eve a day? what are the key strategic questions? >> and thank you for being here. we just heard bob hale struggling with the process but for that budgetary operations but that at the moment and then in the 11th year but the pentagon does not have a lot of opposition. we don't know how many are needed because of abom
in where we don't trust med sip and science to help us figure out what the answer should be. >> that's to go to a point you made earlier, a process to take years, if not decades to understand ramifications; right? we're at the very beginning of a very long road here. >> can i just -- >> yeah. >> the -- i propose something both of you said. i'm not against experimentation. i'm actually in favor of it; right? my point was simply on an earlier occasion. it's difficult to stabilize it so to take the gay marriage example, i totally agree with you so far that the process worked well ervetion right? but it is also the case that we may not get enough time to run actual experiments because, you know, half the gay rights community understandably runs around with the due process clause in the hip pocket and doesn't go fast enough, then they jump the gun on this; right? you have -- the problem is not totally similar in the marijuana situation, but i agree with you. i mean, i think you need some comparatives, some states that don't go down the road; right? you don't want to process that is willie
guard at pacific bio sciences smelled a strange odor and felt nauseous. when firefighters arrived on scene, they decided to launch a hazmat operation. safety crews were not sure what type of substances were stored in the building, so they put on those hazmat suits and set up a de contamination area. >> we set up a hot zone, a warm zone and a cold zone. prepared to decon an entry team and we did set up an entry team to go in and examine the atmosphere. >> firefighters traced the problem to an overheated ventilation system. >>> new this morning a 16-year- old is recovering in the hospital after being shot overnight. it happened around 10:15 last night on santa theresa way and park boulevard. police say it appears to be a drive-by shooting. the teen was taken to the hospital and is in stable condition. >>> at this hour, the search continues for a man who stabbed a cab driver outside macarthur bart station. oakland police say the incident began last night with an argument between a man and woman on board a train. the woman got off the train and the man chased after her and followed he
of anecdotal claims in lawsuits that aren't true when science is in. the people in pennsylvania brought in the epa and insists -- they said the water was safe. they were angry because that was the end of the lawsuit. every time there's an antidote and analysis, it shows that fracking doesn't pollute the water. >> we have a quote from the department of environmental conservation that finds fault with the new report saying the document is nearly a year old, does not reflect final policy and no conclusions should be drawn from this partial, outdated study. would it help to have a new study done? >> if you like throwing good money after bad. as you say, it's a rehash of hold studies. the first well in america was fracked in 1987. we've report after report and it's time to stop reporting and start doing. people need to take a decision on this. every time it comes to a new state or new country like my country, ireland, the analysis is done. >> one of the serious images was the fact people in fracking areas could light their tap water on fire. that was debunkedded because you proved it has bee
this conversation is driven by data. >> you often here the left accuse the right of ignoring social science on this question. does gun control reduce violence? i have never seen any evidence that it does. we ought to let the numbers guide our policy making decisions it it seems to me. >> we will see what happens on tuesday. very thought-provoking plan. obviously it will be coming out. headlines and see what else is happening. new overnight the flu outbreak. 47 states slammed with the virus. there is word that it may have peaked. some words that saw the earliest outbreaks are now reporting the number of cases going down. the season is not over yet. the big push to get the vaccine concerns over shortages remain today. >> you may have to call around to a place or two to get it a lot of the doctors who ordered vaccines or clinics who ordered vaccines did so and gave a lot out in the fall. >> still the cdc says the. >> i -- two month delay in the arraignment of the dark night shooter loads to outburst in court. gave the shooter until march to enter a plea. that caused the father of one of the vi
Search Results 0 to 29 of about 30 (some duplicates have been removed)